Spring Planting 2016

Spring is off to a crazy start and we've been extra busy here on the farm. February and part of March were spent planning and laying out each of the new rows to be put in. Our first set of plants arrived in early April on one of the coldest weeks on record. By the end of our spring planting we'll have put over 1,000 brambles in the ground (raspberries, black raspberries, and blackberries) along with 40 hardy kiwi vines on overhead trellising.

Rows marked out and ready for planting

Rows marked out and ready for planting

God Provides

I really wasn't sure how we were going to do it. With several orders of hundreds of bareroot brambles I didn't know how we'd manage to get them all in the ground in timely fashion. Then in February we get a call from our friend and pastor Chris Pace from Family Life Church in Cypress, TX.

"We'd like to do a mission trip to your farm this year, would you be open to that?" he asked. 

"Well, yea, that'd be great! But us? Isn't there somewhere else with greater needs?"

We honestly did not feel like we deserved to have someone come help us, but we listened to Chris' thoughts and remembered that God offers us His grace (unmerited favor) freely through Jesus. So eventually we made plans and they planned a scouting trip in early April to coincide with the primary planting push.

April came and the plants showed up in several large boxes. Wanting to keep the soil structure as intact as possible, we hand-dug holes for the plants at the required spacings. The Texas crew got to work in the heavy wind, rain, and near record cold for a few days to get all of the plants in. We can't say thank you enough to Chris, Tori, Kari, and Garrett for pushing through with us and are looking forward to their return trip in June.

Kat and I along with Chris, Tori, Garrett, and Kari from Family Life Church of Cypress

Kat and I along with Chris, Tori, Garrett, and Kari from Family Life Church of Cypress

Garrett and I digging holes for planting

Garrett and I digging holes for planting

Bundles of berries, waiting to be planted

Bundles of berries, waiting to be planted

Berry Trellis & Hardy Kiwis

Perhaps it was foolish of us (okay, me), but the plants we got in the ground this year really required the most work of any of the fruiting plants we'll put in. We'll be putting in trellising for the berries along with irrigation to give them consistent watering the first few years while they get established. To tackle weeds we're going to try woven landscape fabric. It has worked well in the past, is durable and reasonably long-lasting.

A weed barrier partially in place for our blackberries.

A weed barrier partially in place for our blackberries.

The hardy kiwis (kiwi berries) we purchased are a variety called "Passion Poppers" from Kiwi Berry Organics, just north of here. If you've never tried kiwi berries before, I'd highly recommend them. They're a sweeter, bite-sized version of the fuzzy kiwis. Hardy kiwi is a vine that grows best on some form of a trellis, somewhat like grapes, and needs to be regularly pruned because of its extremely vigorous growth. I've seen reports of individual shoots growing more than 30 feet in a season! We're using a ~6' high, 5 wire overhead t-trellis with 8ft cross arms. The kiwi mostly hang down for easier picking and the overhead trellis affords easier pruning in both the growing season and the dormant season.

We were fortunate to find black locust posts from a local source and are using them for the berry trellising as well as our new goat fencing. Not only are the posts stronger than pine, they're also likely more durable than treated posts. We're hopeful that the posts will outlast the fence (and maybe even us!).

Newly planted hardy kiwi on their trellis

Newly planted hardy kiwi on their trellis

Clearing the Fencerow

Slow and steady work continues on clearing the fencerow for new goat fencing and to exclude deer. We hope to reclaim about an acre of previously overgrown land to utilize it for goat pasture and also plant some of our larger nut trees and sugar maples. Posts will be set in the next few weeks and then the crew from Family Life Church will help us hang the fence. The area we're fencing is just filled with bush and vine honeysuckle, poison ivy, as well as brambles and multiflora rose, all the goats' favorite foods!

Posts pounded on our western fencerow

Posts pounded on our western fencerow

Nursery Prep

The figs and other tender plants are finally out from their winter's rest in the garage and are getting ready to move toward our small nursery. We had some plans to finish the nursery area and example gardens this spring but other plans kept us too busy. Look for more changes coming next year!

Also, if you're in the market for a fig tree, Contact Us to inquire about stopping by to pick up one (or three). We'll have smaller plants available in just a couple weeks and have a few larger 3 gallon plants available now.

Cover Crops

And finally, our fall-planted cover crop is coming along nicely. It's a mix of small grains along with crimson clover and hairy vetch for nitrogen fixation. The crimson clover has recently come into bloom and we'll cut it for hay. In the meantime it makes for a beautiful field to look at and improves the soil.

Look for another update in June once the mission crew has visited!

Crimson clover in full bloom

Crimson clover in full bloom

Part of our cover crop, cut for hay

Part of our cover crop, cut for hay

Winter Planning

After a rather mild start, winter is here and holding on. No matter, there's plenty to do while the ground is frozen and the fig trees are resting happily in our garage. We've been up to a good bit of planning this winter and wanted to give an update for what to look for in the coming year. We're excited about what's to come and hope you will be too. Okay, maybe not as excited as us, but only because we're big plant nerds.

Organic Certification

Big news! We've officially started our organic certification process! We're pursuing our certification through Pennsylvania Certified Organic (PCO) and hope to have our first crops certified in June of 2017, 2018 at the latest. It's a three year process for crop production and we hope to eventually have the majority of our production certified.

Look for organic u-pick raspberries, blackberries, and black raspberries in 2017!

Figs Again

Once again we've started a number of fig trees in our basement for sale in the spring. We're attempting to root around 160 trees, not nearly the 450 we went for last year but enough to sell and keep us busy. We've pared down the number of varieties based on what sold last year and interest from our customers. I've included a list below for those interested. We're still somewhat undecided about shipping figs this spring since we'll be busy with quite a number of projects, so stay tuned. Trees will always be available for pickup here at the farm.

Varieties for 2016

Adriatic JH, Atreano, Black Madeira, Black Weeping, Col de Dame Blanc, Col de Dame Gris, Col de Dame Noir, Dark Portuguese, Florea, Hunt, Kathleen's Black, Keddie, Latarolla, Longue D'Aout, LSU Improved Celeste, Macool, Malone, Malta Black, Maltese Falcon, Marseilles Black VS, Nero 600M, Niagara Black, Ronde de Bordeaux, Smith, Takoma Violet

Fig starts just 2-3 weeks into the growing process. We're growing in a much warmer basement (77-79F) so progress is much faster this year.

Fig starts just 2-3 weeks into the growing process. We're growing in a much warmer basement (77-79F) so progress is much faster this year.

Young leaves on a Syrian variety, 'Qalaat Al Madiq'. We received some cuttings from a good friend and will be trying this variety along with Chiappetta, Dottato Nero, and Izbat An Naj (Egyptian variety) this year.

Young leaves on a Syrian variety, 'Qalaat Al Madiq'. We received some cuttings from a good friend and will be trying this variety along with Chiappetta, Dottato Nero, and Izbat An Naj (Egyptian variety) this year.

Orchard Plans

After a year of cover-cropping we're finally ready to begin planting a portion of the land. We'll continue our cover crop rotation on the remainder of the land to continue building soil while gradually taking over the entirety.

This year's plantings are brambles (raspberries, blackberries, and black raspberries) and hardy kiwi berries (fuzz-less, sweeter, grape-sized versions of what you're used to in the grocery store). We've been busy selecting the best-tasting, productive, most disease-resistant berries that will cover the longest harvest span. We'll be putting in almost 1,000 plants along with all of the supporting trellising for the planting. 

Brambles can begin bearing in the year they're planted with a half-decent crop the following year. Expect that we'll open the u-pick for these early and mid-summer berries in June and July of 2017.

Planning out varieties, spacing, and irrigation for our bramble planting this year.

Planning out varieties, spacing, and irrigation for our bramble planting this year.

Nursery Plans

One of our goals has been to offer fruit trees and bushes to the home gardener who desires to grow their own fruit. We've dedicated about an acre of land to a nursery area containing display plantings of our favorite fruiting trees, the trees available to purchase, and some greenhouse and fig growing space. We'd like to incorporate espaliered pears, apples, and other fruiting trees, plantings of rare and unusual fruits, and highlight some of the low maintenance fruits you can grow in the area.

The area we've set aside was planted with a low-growing grass mix this past spring. The mix of grass we used was designed for orchards to reduce maintenance but still provide nice walkways. It's supposed to only require 1-3 mowings a year and minimal inputs fertilizer-wise. If it proves itself we'll continue using it on the remainder of the orchard.

With all of that said, neither of us are trained landscape designers so we've been playing around with some possible designs for the space to make it both attractive and functional. We'll keep you updated!

Got ideas for us? Please leave them in the comments!

Attempting to come up with a design that is functional, beautiful, easy to maintain, and that will allow us to expand in the future. Not an easy task!

Attempting to come up with a design that is functional, beautiful, easy to maintain, and that will allow us to expand in the future. Not an easy task!

Fencing the Orchard

From the beginning, some of our biggest concerns with the orchard were weeds and preventing deer damage. Our property was fenced back in the 90's when a tree farm was located on the property. The tree farm business stopped sometime in the early 00's and since then the forest has tried to reclaim its lost ground. We've been pondering how to best maintain a clean fence row without resorting to herbicides.

Enter fencing and goats.

This past year we fenced in two-thirds of an acre of pasture for our Nigerian dwarf goats and chickens. A portion of that was a really overgrown and weedy patch that we didn't bother to clear prior to setting the goats loose. They loved it. Every day they would walk past lush green grass to feed on every kind of weed and brush imaginable. That got the wheels turning. Turns out goats love to eat the kinds of weeds that thrive in farm fencerows: brambles, multiflora rose, poison ivy (crazy, right?), and honeysuckle. They'll girdle young trees and strip them of leaves. They're masters at land-clearing and eating down weeds. Goats get a free meal and we get a cleared fencerow, sounds like a win-win to me.

This summer we'll be fencing in almost our entire property, twice. We hope to let the goats in the fence by mid-summer to begin the clearing process. If all goes according to plan they'll have cleared a little over an acre by the time fall rolls around.

In addition to weed control, we hope the fence will serve a second purpose: keeping deer out of the orchard. I've heard that it's best to exclude deer from an area prior to planting, that way they don't know what they're missing on the other side of the fence. If they're used to browsing on fruit trees, then fencing them out becomes a much harder task. This approach seemed to work at our old property. We put up a 6 foot deer and orchard fence there prior to planting and no deer have bothered it. Okay, there was one or two times, but only because the gate was left wide open by the guy writing this article.

Chopped down brushy flowering pears become winter snacks for the goats. They'll clear these limbs of bark and buds.

Chopped down brushy flowering pears become winter snacks for the goats. They'll clear these limbs of bark and buds.

Starting to clear the fence row of brush. We'll first pull down existing old fence wire, chop down larger trees, then bush hog the area to get it ready to put up new goat fencing.

Starting to clear the fence row of brush. We'll first pull down existing old fence wire, chop down larger trees, then bush hog the area to get it ready to put up new goat fencing.

Looking to Spring

As I write, snow flurries are falling and snow blankets the land. Before long though, crocuses will bravely venture above ground and buds will begin to swell. Spring is not long off. In the meantime, we'll be busy making final preparations and doing any work we can ahead of time. We have a busy spring ahead of us!

Lord willing, those are our plans for this year. Let us know what you think in the comments!


Fig trees available for bareroot fall shipment

Fall is upon us and our trees our trees have settled in for their winter's rest. We've finally had a chance to pot up all our trees and have done an inventory for the year. As a result, we're making our larger, 3 gallon, trees available for bareroot shipping. Our 3 gallon trees are priced at double the price of our normal trees due to their size. We had a good growing year and the trees were very vigorous. You should expect that the 3 gallon-sized trees are, in general, 18-36" tall and very well-rooted. Some were up-potted rather late so they didn't have a chance to fully fill their 3 gallon pots with roots. If you're into propagating from cuttings, you should be able to pull 3-4 cuttings from each tree.

Unfortunately we cannot offer a guarantee on our bareroot trees due to the unpredictability of winter weather and the subtropical nature of fig trees. We successfully store our trees in pots in an unheated, insulated garage for the winter and they all do very well with minimal care. Please order only if you're confident in storing trees for the winter, otherwise you may be better off waiting to order in spring.

Orders placed this week will ship the week of 11/23 or 11/30 (weather permitting). Shipments may be delayed to 11/30 due to the Thanksgiving holiday. We'll continue shipping, winter permitting, into about mid-December.

Shipping rates are $15 per order plus $2 for each tree (1 tree = $17, 2 trees = $19, 3 trees = $21, etc). Because we're a small outfit, we require a $100 order minimum to ship your order. We don't aim to make money from our shipping, just to cover costs.

Finally, we're offering discounts on several of our cultivars: LSU Gold, LSU Tiger, Lyndhurst White, and Sal's Corleone. These are very nice trees and are available for 25% or more off their normal price. Our Sal's Corleone trees are very large and were in their second leaf this year.

Order through our store!

Some of our dormant trees waiting for a new home

Some of our dormant trees waiting for a new home

More figs waiting for a good home!

More figs waiting for a good home!

Orders are secure and are processed through our payment provider, Square.

We're still here!

Yea, we haven't written in an embarrassingly long time. Gosh, it's been a busy summer. We've been running around like crazy trying to get our land ready for planting next year through the use of cover crops, remodeling the farmhouse, and moving (yep, we moved to the farm!). Oh, and putting up a fence for the goats and chickens, moving outbuildings and fixing up the existing agricultural well. Other than that, things have been quiet...

We still have figs for sale for pickup only (they're HUGE this year), but Contact Us for availability information as we're in the middle of potting up everything. Our Store will have an updated inventory soon with a list of plants available for pickup.

We've been getting questions regarding availability of plants in the fall for shipping and unfortunately we won't have all that many. Next year we'll make an attempt to propagate more plants to be ready for the fall season. As the few we have become ready I'll place them in our Store.

Thanks for your support this year and your patience through a busy summer! God has been so gracious to us. Look for an updated picture post soon.

Fruit Trees for Sale 2015

Our fruit trees are now for sale! We've spent the winter propagating and now the trees (figs and pomegranates) are ready for new homes. Head on over to our Store to place an order. Due to our store vendor, pickup orders can currently only be placed during our normal business hours (Mon-Sat, 8am-5pm), but you can also Contact Us and we'll be happy to put in an order for ya. See below for more info.

There are two options for receiving your order: shipping or pickup. You will need to order a minimum of $100 for a shipped order. Shipping charges are a $15 + $2 for each tree ordered. Unfortunately no shipping to AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, OR, UT, WA or internationally due to current restrictions. We will continue shipping until the weather gets hot (probably mid to late June). Any orders placed this week will likely ship on 5/18 or 5/25 (depending on the volume of orders received).

No minimum applies for orders picked up at the farm in Mechanicsburg. Pickup instructions will be shown after you make your purchase (you'll basically just need to call ahead and arrange it). PA sales tax applies for PA residents.

Some trees will be available in very limited quantities, so if there's a tree you want, get your order in early!

Baby fig trees in need of a good home

Baby fig trees in need of a good home

Week in Pictures 4/19/2015

What a nice week here at the farm. The warmth seemed to wake up all the plants, all at once. We love the beauty of the flowering trees, especially the stone fruits (peaches, plums, cherries, apricots) and pome fruits (pears and apples). Even if these trees are tricky to get good fruit without sprays, they're worth planting just for the spring blossoms. Some of our trees are flowering for the first time this year and some will flower in late April to early May (apple, persimmon, pawpaw) and on into June (jujube). We hope you enjoy these fruit blossoms and hope it even spurs you to start your own little orchard!

Amelanchier x grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance' Serviceberry

Amelanchier x grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance' Serviceberry

'Harbinger' peach in almost full bloom

'Harbinger' peach in almost full bloom

'Ruby Sweet' plum. Let's hope for at least a few this year!

'Ruby Sweet' plum. Let's hope for at least a few this year!

Everything has taken on that spring green color. 

Everything has taken on that spring green color. 

An espaliered Asian pear 'Yoinashi' is among the first to bloom. 

An espaliered Asian pear 'Yoinashi' is among the first to bloom. 

Some of the blueberries are rather close to opening. Can't wait for fresh berries in just a couple months. 

Some of the blueberries are rather close to opening. Can't wait for fresh berries in just a couple months. 

Honeyberries put on some nice blossoms and are one of the first fruits to ripen. If only I could get to the fruit before the birds do. 

Honeyberries put on some nice blossoms and are one of the first fruits to ripen. If only I could get to the fruit before the birds do.